Germany and Japan have agreed to refrain from conducting damaging anti-satellite tests that can result in hazardous orbital dust clouds, according to a report by Space.com.

Both of these commitments were announced at the UN’s open-ended working group on minimizing space risks’ second session, which is taking place in Geneva from Sept. 12 to Sept. 16.

germany and japan follow the us in abandoning destructive anti-satellite tests
(Photo : JODY AMIET/AFP via Getty Images)
This photograph taken on September 7, 2022, shows Arianespace’s Ariane 5 rocket with EUTELSAT Konnect VHTS (Very High Throughput Satellite) satellite onboard lifting up from the launchpad, at the Europes Spaceport, at the Guiana Space Center in Kourou, French Guiana. – The satellite should provide high-speed Internet access throughout Europe, particularly in isolated regions with poor coverage, offering a service comparable to fiber optic networks in terms of performance and costs, as with speed of 500 Gbps it is said to reduce the digital divide on the Old Continent and meet the broadband connectivity needs of fixed and mobile telecommunications networks on land, sea and air.

Lessening Hazards in Space

The working group’s meeting aims to consider strategies to lessen hazards in space by developing and upholding standards and guidelines for responsible conduct.

In response to Russia’s destruction of a satellite in November 2021, which resulted in a significant cloud of space debris, the United States, Canada, and New Zealand announced similar commitments. Germany and Japan have now followed suit.

On Monday, Sept. 12, Japan made the declaration at the UN working group, and on Tuesday, its Ministry of Foreign Affairs officially released a written statement.

The Japanese government declared that it “decided not to conduct destructive, direct-ascent anti-satellite (ASAT) missile testing in order to actively promote discussions in the international for concerning the development of norms of responsible behavior in outer space.”

Germany announced on Tuesday that it would also follow the same commitment. Germany’s declaration to the working group, published in full by the UN Office for Disarmament Affairs, declared that the country “commits not to conduct destructive, direct-ascent anti-satellite missile testing.”

VP Harris Reaffirms US Support

The National Space Council (NSC) met on Friday at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston, and U.S. Vice President Kamala Harris reaffirmed that the country would push for stronger international cooperation on ending destructive anti-satellite tests, which can result in thousands of pieces of debris endangering other spacecraft.

The chance of other spacecraft entering Earth’s orbit increases due to the massive amount of space trash created by direct-ascent anti-satellite (ASAT) tests that use missiles to destroy satellites that are already dead or are dying.

Russia created a cloud with its widely condemned ASAT test in November 2021, forcing the International Space Station to make numerous evasive maneuvers.

The United States, New Zealand, Germany, Japan, and Canada are the five countries that have so far vowed to refrain from conducting harmful direct-ascent anti-satellite tests.

Related Article:

Written by Joaquin Victor Tacla

Keyword: Germany and Japan Follow the US in Abandoning Destructive Anti-Satellite Tests

TECH'S NEWS RELATED

Glass microspheres won't save Arctic sea ice

A proposal to cover Arctic sea ice with layers of tiny hollow glass spheres about the thickness of one human hair would actually accelerate sea-ice loss and warm the climate rather than creating thick ice and lowering the temperature as proponents claim. Sea ice, by reflecting the majority of ...

View more: Glass microspheres won't save Arctic sea ice

NASA’s SpaceX Crew-5 Picture-Perfect Launch to International Space Station

SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket and Dragon spacecraft, named Endurance, lift off from Launch Pad 39A at Kennedy Space Center in Florida on October 5, 2022, for the Crew-5 mission to the International Space Station. Credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett It was a picture-perfect launch during a sun-splashed afternoon on Florida’s Space ...

View more: NASA’s SpaceX Crew-5 Picture-Perfect Launch to International Space Station

How satellites harm astronomy: what’s being done

How satellites harm astronomy: The problem with increasing satellites The impact on radio astronomy What can visual astronomers do? What can satellite operators do? Official efforts to reduce harm from satellites A reminder of what we’re losing when satellites harm astronomy Artist’s concept shows the 30,000 planned satellites from ...

View more: How satellites harm astronomy: what’s being done

1st planet orbiting a sunlike star discovered 27 years ago

51 Pegasi b: 1st planet found orbiting a sunlike star Other names for the planet 51 Pegasi b 51 Pegasi b was the first of thousands of exoplanets What we know about 51 Pegasi b Searching for exoplanets is challenging Astronomers discovered the 1st planet orbiting a sunlike star ...

View more: 1st planet orbiting a sunlike star discovered 27 years ago

Poverty, climate, space: China's progress in 10 years under Xi

Xi Jinping’s China has dragged millions out of extreme poverty, sent spacecraft to the Moon and committed itself to cutting greenhouse gas emissions. On the brink of securing a third term, the president can boast of several achievements in his first 10 years in power, though some do come ...

View more: Poverty, climate, space: China's progress in 10 years under Xi

Supercomputer Simulations Reveal How a Giant Impact Could Have Formed the Moon

Credit: Durham University Pioneering scientists from Durham University’s Institute for Computational Cosmology used the most detailed supercomputer simulations yet to reveal an alternative explanation for the Moon’s origin, 4.5 billion years ago. It revealed that a giant impact between Earth and a Mars-sized body could immediately place a Moon-like ...

View more: Supercomputer Simulations Reveal How a Giant Impact Could Have Formed the Moon

Uploading the Cloud Imager

The development of Europe’s second generation polar-orbiting weather satellites has reached another decisive milestone with the installation of the Ice Cloud Imager Instrument (ICI) onto the MetOp-SG-B satellite. The novel sensor has now been successfully integrated at Airbus’ Satellite Integration Centre in Friedrichshafen, Germany. ICI is one of the ...

View more: Uploading the Cloud Imager

NASA's Juno gets highest-resolution close-up of Jupiter's moon Europa

Observations from the spacecraft’s pass of the moon provided the first close-up in over two decades of this ocean world, resulting in remarkable imagery and unique science. The highest-resolution photo NASA’s Juno mission has ever taken of a specific portion of Jupiter’s moon Europa reveals a detailed view of ...

View more: NASA's Juno gets highest-resolution close-up of Jupiter's moon Europa

Tiangong space station marks key step in assembly

North Korea fires two ballistic missiles, blames US drills 'escalation'

Millennium Space Systems awarded Space Safari effort

Detained American leaves Iran removing one hurdle to nuclear deal

Earth Blox announces no-code SaaS offering for data analysts at Google's Geo for Good Summit 2022

Homemade 'DIY' weapons boost Ukraine war arsenal

The censor cannot hold: the pressure of controlling China's internet

Northrop Grumman's new navigation capability approved for US Navy deployment

US Space Surveillance Telescope in Australia achieves initial operational capability

Moon Could Have Formed Right After a 'Cataclysmic' Impact; Supercomputer Simulation Shows Details of the Lunar Formation

Dryland soybean yield in NE China sets new record

SpaceX's Falcon Heavy Set To Fly Again Later This Month for a US Space Force Mission After Three Years

OTHER TECH NEWS

;